Course: ELE 203
Instructor: Naveen Verma
S 2018

Description of Course Goals and Curriculum

The goal of this class is to develop students' proficiency in both analysing and designing circuits. The class begins with an overview of circuit concepts discussed in PHY 104, but quickly accelerates into discussing Fourier Frequency Analysis and Laplace Analysis, both of which introduces a bunch of new mathematical concepts. The class also develops circuit design through 3 "mini-projects" which help students learn how to physically build circuits.
The labs are really cool - you get to build a radio receiver and a brain-machine interface! It is amazing to see the mathematics developed in class put into practice.
The labs are really cool - you get to build a radio receiver and a brain-machine interface! It is amazing to see the mathematica developes in class put into practice.

Learning From Classroom Instruction

The best way to do well is to listen carefully to the instructor during class time. Take time to write down the notes, even though you may think it is all found in the textbook. Certain ideas are more thoroughly explained, which may give you a hint towards what will appear on the exams.  Professor Verma tells you everything you need to know during lecture, and even though the content may often seem repetitive, the algebraic techniques that are taught are extremely important. Professor Verma is excellent at answering questions in class, so if you are a little confused, a lot of other people probably are too - so please ask!

Learning For and From Assignments

The assignments are by far the most important study tools that this course offfers. Even thought they are only worth 10% of the final grade, they provide essential practice for the exams - so even though one could easily copy off somebody else (which of course is against the Honor Code), it is much better to do the assignments yourself. Start early, note down the concepts you do not quite understand, and be sure to check it over with others! Also, I would recommend reading the chapters before doing the problem sets and looking over the example problems. I'm sure it may be hard to keep up with this throughout the semester, but it will greatly help you in preparation for the exams, which are decently harder than the problem sets. Also, try to do as many practice problems from the textbook as you can before the exams, other than just the assigned homework questions.

External Resources

Basically everything you need to know for this course can be found in the textbook. Other then that, the precepts provide a lot of the backbone for the material for the week and help ease you into the problem sets, so I would definitely recommend going to them. Also, forming pset or study groups would be greatly valuable as well, especially in preparing for the exams.

What Students Should Know About This Course For Purposes Of Course Selection

If you are an ELE major, you have to take it. If you are considering becoming an ELE major and have already taken PHY 104, then I would highly recommend taking this during your Freshman spring. It provides good insight into what being an ELE major is like, and can help you decide whether the major is right for you. That being said, a decent number of non-ELE majors take the class and seem to enjoy it as well. Professor Verma is extremely nice and is very passionate about the material, so lectures are never dry. If you like circuits, I am sure you would enjoy this class.
Introduction to Circuit Analysis and Electronics

2 thoughts on “Introduction to Circuit Analysis and Electronics

  • April 20, 2018 at 3:27 pm
    Permalink

    The labs are really cool – you get to build a radio receiver and a brain-machine interface! It is amazing to see the mathematica developes in class put into practice.

    • April 20, 2018 at 3:29 pm
      Permalink

      The labs are really cool – you get to build a radio receiver and a brain-machine interface! It is amazing to see the mathematics developed in class put into practice.

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