Course: FRS149
Instructor: Jean-Christophe de Swaan
F 2019

Description of Course Goals and Curriculum

This course focuses on the financial world, its stigma, reputation and morals. It discusses the impact that finance has and the way that firms and individuals have used this impact for the worse or better. All of this is discussed through a case-based approach and in class discussions. FRS149 draws on a variety of topics including but not limited to: moral philosophy, behavioral ethics and financial theory. Assignments consist out of weekly readings and writing assignments, one of which is due during midterm week and the other one is due on Deans date. These essays are often on a case basis and talk about certain events like the financial crisis, or individuals that have behaved particularly (un)ethical within the financial world.

Learning From Classroom Instruction

This class lays heavy weight on in-class participation. Class discussions are extremely interesting and the size off this class definitely adds to that. To get the most out of class room instruction I consider two things to be quite important: sleep and preparation: Classes are three hours long and it can be hard to stay focused all throughout the class, so a good nights sleep I would consider crucial. The readings play a substantial role during classroom instruction and being able to at least understand their narratives and conclusions can be quite helpful. That being said, readings are really long, especially for newly arrived freshmen, so try and skim/summarize the text to save time.

Learning For and From Assignments

External Resources

What Students Should Know About This Course For Purposes Of Course Selection

FRS149 course leans more on the financial side of things then on the moral/ethical side, even though the course description might indicate otherwise. Keep that in mind while considering this course for your first semester at Princeton, as interest in financial theory is crucial.
Ethics in Finance

3 thoughts on “Ethics in Finance

  • February 12, 2021 at 5:01 pm
    Permalink

    This course focuses on the financial world, its stigma, reputation and morals. It discusses the impact that finance has and the way that firms and individuals have used this impact for the worse or better. All of this is discussed through a case-based approach and in class discussions. FRS149 draws on a variety of topics including but not limited to: moral philosophy, behavioral ethics and financial theory.

    Assignments consist out of weekly readings and writing assignments, one of which is due during midterm week and the other one is due on Deans date. These essays are often on a case basis and talk about certain events like the financial crisis, or individuals that have behaved particularly (un)ethical within the financial world.

  • February 12, 2021 at 5:08 pm
    Permalink

    This class lays heavy weight on in-class participation. Class discussions are extremely interesting and the size off this class definitely adds to that. To get the most out of class room instruction I consider two things to be quite important: sleep and preparation:

    Classes are three hours long and it can be hard to stay focused all throughout the class, so a good nights sleep I would consider crucial. The readings play a substantial role during classroom instruction and being able to at least understand their narratives and conclusions can be quite helpful. That being said, readings are really long, especially for newly arrived freshmen, so try and skim/summarize the text to save time.

  • February 12, 2021 at 5:11 pm
    Permalink

    FRS149 course leans more on the financial side of things then on the moral/ethical side, even though the course description might indicate otherwise. Keep that in mind while considering this course for your first semester at Princeton, as interest in financial theory is crucial.

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